So I don’t need to fly to Munich to see this anymore.

I officially want to skip summer.

Future Island, 24th October, Porto.

Inch of Dust

A part of me you have
A part of me you hold
Apart from me you stand
And there’s parts that you had stole

Littering in the cupboards
Like some pieces of the puzzle
A nest just like a mother
The dampness of your sweater

It’s never put together
As I watched you from the window
Behind the curtains you turned
Slowly as a teacher
Wrap around you tightly
This love is built in metal
Fall around in shadows

It’s never put together
It’s never put together
Behind the curtains you turned
Fall slowly as a feather

The part of you I have
The part of you I hide
The parts of you I hold
The parts you left behind

Call me
I’ll be there always

And call me
I’ll be there always

And call me
I’ll be there always

Call me
I’ll be there always

B i k e s

Daniel Marques& João Diogo Marques, working together again (even if it’s just for a couple of hours), after winning in 2006 the short-film competition at Fantasporto Festival.  This time around for a video competition launched by Action4Climate.

Show some love for the bikes and for my niece saying bikes in Portuguese. Obviously, the most good-looking 4 year old in the neighborhood. 

"As the global impact of climate change is escalating and we are starting to feel the effects in our own backyard, we must start to act locally. So what can you do to help our planet"?

How True Detective’s Cinematographer Got These 9 Shots

If you’re one of those people still trying to figure how was it possible to create a TV Show so effortlessly beautiful with such a cunning, powerful and engaging plot, then maybe you might want to read the following article by Vulture.

Here’s Adam Arkapaw, True Detective’s cinematographer-  also the man behind Top the Lake cinematography. Which, no wonder, happens to be one of the most jaw-dropping TV shows I’ve ever seen, when it comes to cinematography.

Read the Article:

How True Detective’s Cinematographer Got These 9 Shots

And here’s also Dante, Redemption, and the last True Detective Essay

Happy 10th Anniversary, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind!
Gosh, I’m so old. 
Reach into your memory banks and try to grab hold of the first time you saw Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. You may have to go back further than you thought, because the mind-bending Jim Carrey/Kate Winslet romance, directed by Michel Gondry and scripted by Charlie Kaufman, was released ten years ago today
Full Story: http://www.vulture.com/2014/03/happy-10th-anniversary-eternal-sunshine.html

Happy 10th Anniversary, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind!

Gosh, I’m so old. 

Reach into your memory banks and try to grab hold of the first time you saw Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. You may have to go back further than you thought, because the mind-bending Jim Carrey/Kate Winslet romance, directed by Michel Gondry and scripted by Charlie Kaufman, was released ten years ago today

Full Story: http://www.vulture.com/2014/03/happy-10th-anniversary-eternal-sunshine.html

I want to stress this again: In many, many parts of the country right now, if you want to go to see a movie in the theater and see a current movie about a woman — any story about any woman that isn’t a documentary or a cartoon — you can’t. You cannot. There are not any. You cannot take yourself to one, take your friend to one, take your daughter to one.

There are not any.

By far your best shot, numbers-wise, at finding one that’s at least even-handedly featuring a man and a woman is Before Midnight (on 891 screens) so I hope you like it. Because it’s pretty much that or a solid, impenetrable wall of movies about dudes.

Dudes in capes, dudes in cars, dudes in space, dudes drinking, dudes smoking, dudes doing magic tricks, dudes being funny, dudes being dramatic, dudes flying through the air, dudes blowing up, dudes getting killed, dudes saving and kissing women and children, and dudes glowering at each other.

Somebody asked me this morning what “the women” are going to do about this. I don’t know. I honestly am at the point where I have no idea what to do about it. Stop going to the movies? Boycott everything?

They put up Bridesmaids, we went. They put up Pitch Perfect, we went. They put up The Devil Wears Prada, which was in two-thousand-meryl-streeping-oh-six, and we went (and by “we,” I do not just mean women; I mean we, the humans), and all of it has led right here, right to this place. Right to the land of zippedy-doo-dah. You can apparently make an endless collection of high-priced action flops and everybody says “win some, lose some” and nobody decides that They Are Poison, but it feels like every “surprise success” about women is an anomaly and every failure is an abject lesson about how we really ought to just leave it all to The Rock.

At The Movies, The Women Are Gone : Monkey See : NPR

The whole article is fantastic, as is pretty much everything Linda Holmes writes. (via kdhart) /  Linda is my pop culture queen. (via laughterkey)

(via sciencevsromance)